jane austen – NY Is Book Country http://nyisbookcountry.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 06:30:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nyisbookcountry.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-32x32.png jane austen – NY Is Book Country http://nyisbookcountry.com/ 32 32 Will reading books make you happier? https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 18:33:36 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier/

FRIDAY January 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) – As for what makes us happy, is it better to read or listen to music than to spend hours playing video games?

Not really, says a team of researchers from the UK and Austria.

“A lot of people think traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, are good for us,” said study leader Niklas Johannes of the University of Oxford.

“Surprisingly, we don’t really have good evidence that this is the case. In fact, this belief that new media is harmful but traditional media is beneficial can be quite elitist, ”he said.

To find out more, Johannes and his colleagues followed the media usage of nearly 2,200 UK participants for two months. Their habits were then compared to the level of anxiety and happiness the participants reported feeling.

It didn’t matter, according to the study, how much time people poked their noses through a book rather than delving into the technology. Ultimately, the two leisure activities had roughly the same impact on a person’s sense of well-being.

Johannes, a postdoctoral researcher in an Oxford Institute program focused on adolescent wellness in the digital age, sought to see how seven types of media affected participants‘ happiness and anxiety levels.

Six weekly surveys were administered to a representative sample of people aged 16 and over.

Participants indicated whether they had been involved in music, television, movies, video games, books, magazines, and / or audiobooks in the past week and how much time they had spent on it. each activity. They also indicated how happy and / or anxious they felt the day before each survey.

Researchers found that people who read or listened to audiobooks had no increase in happiness compared to those who did not. They weren’t any less anxious either.

At the same time, participants who had fun with music, TV, movies, and / or video games seemed slightly more enthusiastic and unhappy than those who didn’t.

“These differences were very small, too small for people to notice,” Johannes said.

The medium that a person uses or for how long has “little or no effect” on happiness, the researchers concluded.

“It’s easy to point fingers at the media when we are faced with big social issues, like mental health,” Johannes said. “But research generally shows that the effect of media on mental health is small. So their bad reputation is certainly not deserved.

Yet Johannes pointed out that social media engagement was not among the activities analyzed by the researchers. And although they track the time spent with different types of media, the researchers did not delve into the specific content of any of the books, magazines, music, videos, or games.

Which means, for now, the results should be interpreted as associations, he said, rather than evidence of cause and effect.

The results were published on January 6 in the journal Scientific reports.

James Maddux, professor emeritus of psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Reviewed the results.

He pointed out that the study did not address the fact that modern life is not so sharply divided between old and new technology. Maddux noted, for example, that when he reads 90% of the time he does so in front of a computer.

Describing himself as “one of those elitist snobs” who long thought reading books was a better use of time than watching TV or playing video games, Maddux said the findings came to him as “unsurprising.”

He suggested the next step might be for researchers to delve deeper into the actual content of the media consumed, to see if what gets absorbed is more critical than how much.

“A study conducted several years ago found that reading what is often referred to as ‘literary fiction’ – [meaning] Jane Austen vs. John Grisham – can lead to an increased capacity for empathy, ”Maddux said. “So maybe what kind of movies and series people watch matters too. “

It would be great, Maddux added, if the authors of this study had access to this information.

More information

There is more information on the effects of digital media on mood in the World Happiness Report.

SOURCES: Niklas Johannes, PhD, postdoctoral researcher, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, England; James Maddux, PhD, Emeritus Professor, Psychology and Principal Investigator, Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia; Scientific reports, January 6, 2022

]]>
Will reading books make you happier? – Consumer health news https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-consumer-health-news/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:41:26 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-consumer-health-news/

FRIDAY January 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) – As for what makes us happy, is it better to read or listen to music than to spend hours playing video games?

Not really, says a team of researchers from the UK and Austria.

“A lot of people think traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, are good for us,” said study leader Niklas Johannes of the University of Oxford.

“Surprisingly, we don’t really have strong evidence as to whether this is the case. In fact, this belief that new media is harmful but traditional media is beneficial can be rather elitist,” he said. declared.

To find out more, Johannes and his colleagues followed the media usage of nearly 2,200 UK participants for two months. Their habits were then compared to the level of anxiety and happiness the participants reported feeling.

It didn’t matter, according to the study, how much time people poked their noses through a book rather than delving into the technology. Ultimately, the two leisure activities had roughly the same impact on a person’s sense of well-being.

Johannes, a postdoctoral researcher in an Oxford Institute program focused on adolescent wellness in the digital age, sought to see how seven types of media affected participants‘ happiness and anxiety levels.

Six weekly surveys were administered to a representative sample of people aged 16 and over.

Participants indicated whether they had been involved in music, television, movies, video games, books, magazines, and / or audiobooks in the past week and how much time they had spent on it. each activity. They also indicated how happy and / or anxious they felt the day before each survey.

Researchers found that people who read or listened to audiobooks had no increase in happiness compared to those who didn’t. They weren’t any less anxious either.

At the same time, participants who had fun with music, TV, movies, and / or video games seemed slightly more enthusiastic and unhappy than those who didn’t.

“These differences were very small, too small for people to notice,” Johannes said.

The means used by a person or for how long has “little or no effect” on happiness, the researchers concluded.

“It’s easy to point fingers at the media when we are faced with big social issues, like mental health,” Johannes said. “But research generally shows that the effect of media on mental health is weak. So their bad reputation is certainly not deserved.”

Yet Johannes pointed out that social media engagement was not among the activities analyzed by the researchers. And although they track the time spent with different types of media, the researchers did not delve into the specific content of any of the books, magazines, music, videos, or games.

Which means, for now, the results should be interpreted as associations, he said, rather than evidence of cause and effect.

The results were published on January 6 in the journal Scientific reports.

James Maddux, professor emeritus of psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Reviewed the results.

He pointed out that the study did not address the fact that modern life is not so sharply divided between old and new technology. Maddux noted, for example, that when he reads 90% of the time he does so in front of a computer.

Describing himself as “one of those elitist snobs” who long thought reading books was a better use of time than watching TV or playing video games, Maddux said the findings came to him as “unsurprising.”

He suggested the next step might be for researchers to delve deeper into the actual content of the media consumed, to see if what gets absorbed is more critical than how much.

“A study conducted several years ago found that reading what is often referred to as ‘literary fiction’ – [meaning] Jane Austen vs. John Grisham – can lead to an increased capacity for empathy, ”Maddux said. “So maybe what kind of movies and series people watch matters too.

It would be great, Maddux added, if the authors of this study had access to this information.

More information

There is more information on the effects of digital media on mood in the World Happiness Report.

SOURCES: Niklas Johannes, PhD, postdoctoral researcher, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, England; James Maddux, PhD, Emeritus Professor, Psychology and Principal Investigator, Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia; Scientific reports, January 6, 2022

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Will reading books make you happier? | Health https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-health/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:39:10 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-health/

FRIDAY January 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) – As for what makes us happy, is it better to read or listen to music than spend hours playing video games?

Not really, says a team of researchers from the UK and Austria.

“A lot of people think traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, are good for us,” said study leader Niklas Johannes of the University of Oxford.

“Surprisingly, we don’t really have strong evidence as to whether this is the case. In fact, this belief that new media is harmful but traditional media is beneficial can be rather elitist,” he said. declared.

To find out more, Johannes and his colleagues followed the media usage of nearly 2,200 UK participants for two months. Their habits were then compared to the level of anxiety and happiness the participants reported feeling.

It didn’t matter, according to the study, how much time people poked their noses through a book rather than delving into the technology. Ultimately, the two leisure activities had roughly the same impact on a person’s sense of well-being.

Johannes, a postdoctoral researcher in an Oxford Institute program focused on adolescent wellness in the digital age, sought to see how seven types of media affected participants‘ happiness and anxiety levels.

Six weekly surveys were administered to a representative sample of people aged 16 and over.

Participants indicated whether they had been involved in music, television, movies, video games, books, magazines, and / or audiobooks in the past week and how much time they had spent on it. each activity. They also indicated how happy and / or anxious they felt the day before each survey.

Researchers found that people who read or listened to audiobooks had no increase in happiness compared to those who did not. They weren’t any less anxious either.

At the same time, participants who had fun with music, TV, movies, and / or video games seemed slightly more enthusiastic and unhappy than those who didn’t.

“These differences were very small, too small for people to notice,” Johannes said.

The means used by a person or for how long has “little or no effect” on happiness, the researchers concluded.

“It’s easy to point fingers at the media when we are faced with big social issues, like mental health,” Johannes said. “But research generally shows that the effect of media on mental health is weak. So their bad reputation is certainly not deserved.”

Yet Johannes pointed out that social media engagement was not among the activities analyzed by the researchers. And although they track the time spent with different types of media, the researchers did not delve into the specific content of any of the books, magazines, music, videos, or games.

Which means, for now, the results should be interpreted as associations, he said, rather than evidence of cause and effect.

James Maddux, professor emeritus of psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Reviewed the results.

He pointed out that the study did not address the fact that modern life is not so sharply divided between old and new technology. Maddux noted, for example, that when he reads 90% of the time he does so in front of a computer.

Describing himself as “one of those elitist snobs” who long thought reading books was a better use of time than watching TV or playing video games, Maddux said the findings came to him as “unsurprising.”

He suggested the next step might be for researchers to delve deeper into the actual content of the media consumed, to see if what gets absorbed is more critical than how much.

“A study conducted several years ago found that reading what is often referred to as ‘literary fiction’ – [meaning] Jane Austen vs. John Grisham – can lead to an increased capacity for empathy, ”Maddux said. “So maybe what kind of movies and series people watch matters too.

It would be great, Maddux added, if the authors of this study had access to this information.

SOURCES: Niklas Johannes, PhD, postdoctoral researcher, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, England; James Maddux, PhD, Emeritus Professor, Psychology and Principal Investigator, Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia; Scientific reports, January 6, 2022

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Will reading books make you happier? | Health info https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-health-info/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/will-reading-books-make-you-happier-health-info/

By Alan Mozes Health Day Reporter

(Health Day)

FRIDAY, Jan. 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — When it comes to what makes us happy, is reading or listening to music better than spending hours playing video games?

Not really, says a team of researchers from the UK and Austria.

“A lot of people think that traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, is good for us,” said study leader Niklas Johannes, from the University of Oxford.

“Surprisingly, we don’t really have strong evidence that this is the case. In fact, this belief that new media is harmful but traditional media is beneficial can be rather elitist,” he said.

To find out more, Johannes and his colleagues tracked the media use of nearly 2,200 UK participants for two months. Their habits were then compared to the level of anxiety and happiness the participants reported feeling.

It didn’t matter, the study showed how long people spent their noses in a book rather than poring over technology. Ultimately, both Hobbies had about the same impact on a person’s sense of well-being.

Johannes, a postdoctoral researcher in an Oxford Institute program focused on adolescent wellbeing in the digital age, set out to see how seven types of media affected participants‘ levels of happiness and anxiety.

Six weekly surveys were administered to a representative sample of people aged 16 and over.

Participants reported whether they had played music, television, movies, video games, books, magazines and/or audiobooks in the previous week and how much time they spent on each activity. They also indicated how happy and/or anxious they felt the day before each survey.

Researchers found that people who read or listen to audiobooks did not gain happiness compared to those who did not. Nor were they less anxious.

At the same time, participants who were having fun with music, TV, movies and/or video games seemed to be slightly more excited and unhappy than those who weren’t.

“These differences were very small – too small for people to notice,” Johannes pointed out.

What media a person uses or for how long has “little or no effect” on happiness, the researchers concluded.

“It’s easy to point fingers at the media when we’re dealing with big social issues, like mental health,” Johannes said. “But research generally shows that the media’s effect on mental health is small, so their bad reputation is certainly undeserved.”

Still, Johannes pointed out that social media engagement was not among the activities analyzed by the researchers. And while they counted time spent with different types of media, the researchers didn’t dig into the specific content of any of the books, magazines, music, videos, or games.

Which means that, for now, the results should be interpreted as associations, he said, rather than evidence of cause and effect.

James Maddux, professor emeritus of psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., reviewed the results.

He pointed out that the study did not address the fact that modern life is not so neatly divided between old and new technology. Maddux noted, for example, that when he reads, 90% of the time he does so in front of a computer.

Describing himself as “one of those elitist snobs” who long believed that reading books was a better use of time than watching TV or playing video games, Maddux said the results came as “unsurprising to him. “.

He suggested that the next step could be for researchers to dive deep into the actual content of media consumed, to see if what is absorbed is more critical than how much.

“A study from several years ago found that reading what is often called ‘literary fiction’ — [meaning] Jane Austen vs. John Grisham — can lead to an increase in empathy,” Maddux said. “So maybe the type of movies and shows people watch is also important.”

It would be great, Maddux added, if the authors of this study had access to this information.

SOURCES: Niklas Johannes, PhD, postdoctoral researcher, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, England; James Maddux, PhD, Professor Emeritus, Psychology and Senior Fellow, Center for Advancing Wellness, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia; Scientific reportsJanuary 6, 2022

Copyright © 2022 health day. All rights reserved.

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Jane Austen’s classic books seem oddly relevant today https://nyisbookcountry.com/jane-austens-classic-books-seem-oddly-relevant-today/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 08:31:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/jane-austens-classic-books-seem-oddly-relevant-today/







Jane Austen’s classic books seem oddly relevant today

































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]]> Dorothy turns classic books into stamps to celebrate great literature and our love of reading https://nyisbookcountry.com/dorothy-turns-classic-books-into-stamps-to-celebrate-great-literature-and-our-love-of-reading/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/dorothy-turns-classic-books-into-stamps-to-celebrate-great-literature-and-our-love-of-reading/

Celebrating the most influential, widely read and essential books from the 17th century to the present day, there are two new prints to feast you on, each containing 42 books reimagined as collectible postage stamps and forming one oversized sheet, just like you. might find if you buy bulk stamps at the post office. Each stamp features a graphic inspired by the book and the date of publication in book form.

The first goes for the classics, such as Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. The second concerns the modern literary titles of the early 20th century onwards, including The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell and On the Road by Jack Kerouac.



Stamp Books: Classic

Stamp Books: Classic



Stamp Books: Classic

“We included classics that made us laugh and cry, scared us, made us feel hot inside, turned us into sleuths and challenged our way of thinking,” says Ali Johnson , half of Dorothy, which she runs. with James Quail. “There are books that tell stories of love, romance, maturity, self-awareness, suffering, deception, excess, revenge, terror and dystopia.”

Each work was designed by James and follows that of Dorothy The color of the books and Reserve the card products, both popular tributes to the world of fiction. Does Ali have a favorite stamp? “At Virginia Woolf’s Lighthouse is my favorite book and I love this stamp. But my favorite stamp, even though I’m not a big fan of the book, is Dracula. I love its simplicity and the way two little dots sum it up. it goes up perfectly, ”she said.

“As for both works, I thought it would be the modern print as I tend to read more contemporary literature now. But working on these prints has rekindled my love for some older classics. dusted off a few favorites to reread including Wuthering Heights, Tess of the d’Urberville, The Yellow Wallpaper and The Good Soldier. “

The prints measure 80cm x 60cm and are printed in litho with an additional silver foil. The two literature-based additions join an ever-expanding line of ‘Stamp Collections’ prints by Dorothy and are available to purchase for £ 35 each from wearedorothy.com from now on.

Stamp Books: Modern



Stamp Books: Modern

Stamp Books: Modern



Stamp Books: Modern

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Classic books summed up in hilarious one-line reviews https://nyisbookcountry.com/classic-books-summed-up-in-hilarious-one-line-reviews/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/classic-books-summed-up-in-hilarious-one-line-reviews/

It was the best review, it was the worst review. Or, in these particular cases, they were the shortest, strangest, and / or just the most direct of them.

We’ve rounded up the funniest and weirdest classic book reviews we could find on GoodReads – the home of some of the most cutting-edge, brutal, and succinct views.

Now we’re reconsidering all of our favorite high school readings. (Above all Catcher in the rye.)

Enjoy!

Anna karenina, Leo Tolstoy

(Credit: GoodReads)

Guess Tolstoy never got the memo?

As i die, William Faulkner

(Credit: GoodReads)

In a way, they are not …wrong?

1984 (nineteen eighty-four), George Orwell

(Credit: GoodReads)
(Credit: GoodReads)

Big Brother is not happy with either.

Catcher in the rye, JD Salinger

(Good reads)
(Good reads)

Alright, ouch.

Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky

(Good reads)

Hey, whatever works.

Great expectations, Charles Dickens

(Good reads)

Ah, OK. This tracks.

Hamlet, William Shakespeare

(Good reads)

Something is rotten in the state of the review section.

Jane eyre, Charlotte Brontë

(Good reads)

It doesn’t matter what floats on your boat, Cristin.

Little woman, Louisa May Alcott

(Good reads)

We can ship with all Taylor Swift classic crossover lit chick.

Lord of the Flies, William Golding

(Good reads)

It’s not even a bad summary.

Moby dick, Herman Melville

(Good reads)

Well. This is factually correct.

Mrs Dalloway, Virginia woolf

(Good reads)

She is trying to buy them for herself, Nate!

Of mice and Men, John Steinbeck

(Good reads)

Evergreen Review. Reliable. Five stars.

Portrait of the artist as a young man, James Joyce

(Good reads)

Moocoow is literally the 14th word in the book, then the 22nd. Nathan must have been happy.

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen

(Good reads)

Duly noted.

Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare

(Good reads)

Extremely fair analysis.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain

(Good reads)

Another solid analysis. Children these days! (Or … a century ago.)

The old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway

(Good reads)

Yeah, and say Moby dickit is Ishmael for righteousness overcome the whale? It doesn’t happen, Matt!

Dorian Gray’s photo, Oscar Wilde

(Good reads)

Hey, you don’t know.

The foreigner, Albert Camus

(Good reads)

I will definitely use it to get out of conversations. “Do you know who you remind me of?” Did you read The stranger? “

The Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë

(Good reads)

Ah, a bittersweet conclusion: Contemporary and classics collide.

And scene.

]]>
How reading books aloud can draw us into intimacy https://nyisbookcountry.com/how-reading-books-aloud-can-draw-us-into-intimacy/ Wed, 03 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/how-reading-books-aloud-can-draw-us-into-intimacy/

Reading aloud is an activity we associate with the cozy comfort of children’s bedtime stories. Certainly the children’s classics of The Gruffalo to the Alice books are produced knowing that when they come to be read, there is a good chance that an older person will read them aloud to a younger one.

The considerable benefits of reading aloud to children are well documented. Researchers found that toddlers who are read to grow into children “more likely to have strong relationships, sharper focus, greater emotional resilience, and greater self-control.”

Unsurprisingly, the American Academy of Pediatrics therefore recommends reading aloud to children. It is even used by sociologists as one of the most important indicators of life prospects.

But if reading aloud does us so much good, why has it become above all the prerogative of childhood?

How silent reading took over

Of course, this has not always been so. Like Meghan Cox Gurdon, the the Wall Street newspaperFrom the advent of the written word until the 10th century, the children’s book reviewer emphasizes “reading was reading aloud.”

Even after silent reading became more common, it coexisted with what English literature professor Abigail Williams calls “communal” and “social” forms of reading until the 19th century. It was only when the voices of the mass media entered the home through radio and television that reading as a public activity shared among consenting adults specifically began to decline.

Children aren’t the only ones who benefit from reading. Photo credit: Pixabay CC BY

But as the books themselves reveal, reading aloud could be more than just social. She can be deeply attractive, forging both intimate and community bonds.

Azar Nafisi’s memoirs on the life of a woman and professor of literature in post-revolutionary Iran, Reading Lolita in Tehran (2003), features students Manna and Nima, who “fell in love largely because of their common interest in literature”. If the love of literature brings this couple together, it is reading it aloud that cements their relationship. The words they read aloud evoke a safe space for their speaking difficulties.

Likewise, in Mansfield Park (1814), Jane Austen uses reading aloud as a very strong turning point in the relationship between protagonist Fanny Price and her recently declared suitor, Henry Crawford. When Henry reads aloud to the assembled assembly, his skill and sensitivity are such that Fanny is forced to sit down and listen in spite of herself.

His needlework, on which she resolutely focuses all of her attention at first, ends up falling to his knees “and finally … in short, fixed on him until the attraction draws Crawford to her, that the book is closed and the spell is broken.

This insistent rehearsal results in some pretty steamy stuff in the Regency Lounge.

Reading as seduction

Elsewhere, reading aloud goes beyond such courting (ultimately unsuccessful). Spoiler alert: Crawford misses his chance with Fanny and runs away with his (already married) cousin (gasp!).

At Bernhard Schlink The reader (1997), reading aloud underpins the relationship between the narrator, Michael, and his much older lover, Hanna – played in the 2008 film adaptation by David Kross / Ralph Fiennes and Kate Winslet.

Whether it’s to keep Michael on track, or out of pure personal interest, Hanna insists that Michael read to her before having sex. It is only much later that Michael and the reader discover that Hanna has two secrets (spoiler alert): she is a former concentration camp guard and she is illiterate.

Here, reading aloud is not just the act of warming up but is an integral part of an ‘intimate ritual of reading, showering, having sex and lying next to one another. the other “. Reading unites these two very different individuals both physically and emotionally. Much later, when Hanna is jailed for war crimes, Michael continues to read to her from a distance. The recorded recordings he sends finally allow him to learn to read himself.

The unhappy fates of some of these relationships show that reading aloud is not a one-way ticket to happiness forever. But these scenes reveal his deep sensuality. According to Gurdon, the the Wall Street newspaperChildren’s book reviewer, “There is incredible power in this fleeting exchange.”

Gurdon also suggests that reading aloud “has an incredible ability to bring us closer to each other”, both figuratively and literally. Where lonely reading pushes us to ourselves – producing the cliched image of the couple reading their own books in bed before turning around and turning off the lights – reading aloud is a shared experience.

Reading aloud takes longer, but that’s part of the point. Slow reading is sensual reading. Unlike audiobooks which are now so firmly a part of the cultural landscape, for adults and children alike, reading aloud is responsive, intuitive and embodied.

The reader is also an observer, who adapts gestures, facial expressions and intonation in response to signals. Listeners, of course, also observe their attention focused on the person in front of or next to them.

With conversation running out after months of lockdown and no restaurants, museums, and movies to go to for quite some time yet, it’s worth remembering that learning and romance is still under the covers (of the book) … so much as we read the words aloud.

Kiera Vaclavik is Professor of Children’s Literature and Childhood Culture at Queen Mary University, London.

This article first appeared on The Conversation.

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20 best romance novels of 2021 https://nyisbookcountry.com/20-best-romance-novels-of-2021/ Mon, 01 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/20-best-romance-novels-of-2021/

Amazon

Light some candles, unwrap some chocolates, slip into something silky, and get ready to turn the heat up with some of the best romance novels on the shelves. With the two old classics on standby (If you haven’t read Pride and Prejudice , what are you waiting for?) and brand new reads (don’t sleep on Isabel Allende’s latest), there’s something for everyone on our list (and don’t forget to browse our guide to the best books of 2020 too).

Whether you’re all excited and disturbed by a historic romance that takes you back to the pulsating hearts of yesteryear, a paranormal romance that proves you don’t need to have flesh and blood to heat things up, heartwarming stories that explore the tender side of love, and of course sexy stories you might not want to read on public transport, we have books to make you blush. And if you think romance isn’t your thing, take a look at this list anyway. The romance genre has a lot to offer beyond the bodices you might have seen lurking in your mom’s nightstand growing up. Along with the love stories you’d expect, many of our favorite romances also feature strong storylines, diverse characters, LGBTQ + love stories, and gorgeous language that keeps us hooked until the last page.

Advertising – Continue Reading Below

1

It ends with us

Colleen Hoover
amazon.com

New to Boston, Lily, a small town girl, manages to convince the magnificent neurosurgeon Ryle Kincaid to break his “no date” rule. But his stubborn ways make her wonder where this aversion comes from. And when an old flame resurfaces, everything she has with Ryle is suddenly called into question.

2

Proposal

jasmine Guillory
amazon.com

You really can’t go wrong with Jasmine Guillory’s romantic and fun lovemaking, but this pick from Reese’s book club is especially great. Freelance writer Nik’s boyfriend comes up with a game of Dodger, and the dude can’t even spell his name correctly. She says no (duh), and the video goes viral. Handsome Doctor Carlos keeps him away from the frenzy, but he can’t be the real deal. Or can he?

RELATED: The 50 best romantic comedies of all time to watch with your friends

3

The hate game

If you’ve ever carried the torch of a colleague (scandal!), This 2016 novel will speak to you. Co-workers Lucy Hutton and her nemesis Joshua Templeman have as fierce a rivalry as they come, especially since they are vying for the same promotion. At least it starts like this.

4

Vision in white

Prolific Nora Roberts has written over 200 romance novels, but this one received top ratings from her fans as the debut installment of The bride’s quartet. Wedding photographer Mackensie “Mac” Elliot runs a wedding planning business with three friends. When a day at work introduces him to sweet and steady English teacher Carter Maguire, their laid-back adventure could lead to its own happy ending.

RELATED: The 25 best romantic movies on Netflix to get you in the mood for love

5

Beautiful disaster

Abby Abernathy swears that she will leave her dark past behind when she goes to college, becoming the consummate good girl. But all of her best intentions are challenged by tattooed campus bad boy Travis Maddox, who cheats on Abby in a month-long bet. The stakes turn out to be higher than they think.

6

Blown away by the wind

Margaret mitchell
amazon.com

If you’ve never read this 900+ page Civil War saga (or watched the four hour film), it’s never too late. Scarlett O’Hara, her “perfect knight” Ashley Wilkes and outrageous but dashing Rhett Butler stand the test of time. Readers have devoured over 30 million copies of this Pulitzer Prize winner since 1936 and once you dive in, you’ll see why.

7

A long sea petal

Isabelle Allende
amazon.com

This all-new read from romance titan Isabel Allende follows pregnant widow Roser and her late lover’s brother, Victor, as they flee fascist Spain aboard a ship chartered by poet Pablo Neruda. As they start again in Chile, the two face trials and tribulations, but hope (and the other) keeps them strong.

8

Pride and Prejudice

Jane austen
amazon.com

$ 9.75

This 1813 book is so old, it’s free if you have a Kindle! And you should definitely enjoy it – it’s basically the OG romance novel. If you’re already a Jane Austen stan, check out Curtis Sittenfeld’s reinterpretation Eligible, which places Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy in today’s Cincinnati.

9

Thorny birds

Colleen McCullough
amazon.com

$ 7.99

This grand, multigenerational tale of life at an Outback sheep station is often described as “an Australian Blown away by the windSo if you like that classic try this one for size. The romance centers mostly on an illicit affair between Maggie, a remote ranch resident, and a handsome priest.

ten

the foreigner

Diana Gabaldon
amazon.com

Before becoming an epic costume drama about Starz, this time-traveling romance novel introduced the world to Claire Randall, a former British combat nurse, and her love interest in the Scottish warrior… who lives in 1743. The one- this has it all: time travels, danger, intrigue, and of course, a lot of passionate love.

11

Delta of Venus

Anais Nin
amazon.com

$ 16.99

If you’ve never read Anaïs Nin and consider yourself a fan of romance, fix that now. This short story collection was written in the 1940s and its romantic erotic themes still hold true. But don’t take our word for it.

12

Call me by your name

You might have seen the movie starring Timothée Chalamet before, but this steamy love story between two young men from the Italian Riviera is worth reading anyway. Pro tip: grab a juicy peach before you break your spine. Just trust us.

13

Laid bare to you

If you like your romance in installments, try the Crossfire series. Big-city newbie Eva Tramell literally falls at the feet of billionaire mogul Gideon Cross, launching a scorching romance that reveals the secrets of their two dark pasts. Seems familiar? There’s a reason one Amazon reviewer called it the “soap opera version of Fifty shades of Grey. “

14

The wife of the time traveler

Audrey Niffenegger
amazon.com

What happens when you fall in love with someone who lives in a totally different timeline? It is the story of Henry DeTamble, a librarian who lifts off in time, and Clare Abshire, an artist whose life moves forward in conventional ways. This romantic tale is as unique as it is beautiful.

15

Aliénor & Parc

Rainbow Rowell
amazon.com

They say you never forget your first love. Test this theory by taking a trip down memory lane with Eleanor and Park, two misfit teenagers in love in 1986. They are smart enough to know that young love never lasts, but brave enough to give it a try.

16

Jane eyre

Charlotte brontë
amazon.com

This 1847 classic tells the story of the brave housekeeper and heroine Jane Eyre and her brooding employer with a terrible secret, Mr. Rochester. Innovative for the time, first-person storytelling set a new standard for what romance could be – no wonder readers still love it more than 170 years later.

17

Love first like: a novel

Hannah orenstein
amazon.com

Eliza co-owns a jewelry store with her sister and accidentally took to Instagram wearing a diamond ring with you-know-which finger. The photo explodes and she realizes that even a false pledge is good for the end result. But then she meets Blake. He’s great, except for one thing: Blake doesn’t know about his ruse, and Eliza doesn’t know how long she can go on.

18

Notebook

Nicolas sparks
amazon.com

Let’s say it’s not, but we first watched * this * rain scene 15 years ago. Revisit Noah and Allie in the 1996 book about a South Carolina socialite separated from her summer sweetheart before their letters (and later their notebooks) brought them together.

19

When Katie met Cassidy

Katie, originally from Kentucky, has just been dumped by her fiancé when she finds herself in front of Cassidy, a New Yorker in a costume of power. At first, Katie doesn’t know how to read Cassidy, until a chance encounter finds them both at a local lesbian bar. It opens Katie’s heart and mind to new possibilities, ones that Cassidy just might play a starring role in.

20

The kiss quotient

No more cheesy stories for victory! In this Helen Hoang novel, Stella Lane is the genius mathematician who gets into a catch-up romance – hiring escort Michael Phan to teach her the ins and outs of sex. We consider this to be the perfect equation for a good read.

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Kate Middleton’s Classic Books | Marie Claire Australia https://nyisbookcountry.com/kate-middletons-classic-books-marie-claire-australia/ Mon, 09 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://nyisbookcountry.com/kate-middletons-classic-books-marie-claire-australia/

Based on the books identified, it would appear that the Duchess of Cambridge has a penchant for classical novels, with the selection featuring literature from the Victorian era (seven out of 12 books date from this time). Jane Austen appears three times, but her most famous romance, Pride and Prejudice, is oddly absent.

The eclectic range of genres is also quite remarkable and forms the basis of a great playlist, spanning murder mysteries, romances, epic adventures, and dark morality tales.

Consider taking your quarantine reading any clues from the Duchess? Want to revise some classic literature?

Scroll down to see all of the books featured in the rare photo of Kate Middleton at Kensington Palace.

Books by Kate Middleton

A Christmas carol and other Christmas writings by Charles Dickens

After reading Christmas Carol, the notoriously reclusive Thomas Carlyle was “seized with a perfect hospitality convulsion” and organized not one but two Christmas dinners. The impact of history may not always have been so dramatic, but, along with other Dickensian Christmas writings, it has had a lasting and significant influence on our ideas about the Christmas spirit and on the season as a moment of celebration, of charity and of Memory.

Buy it here.

Books by Kate Middleton

The sonnets and the complaint of a lover by William Shakespeare

When this volume of Shakespeare’s poems first appeared in 1609, he had already written most of the great plays that made him famous. The 154 sonnets — all but two of which are addressed to a handsome young man or a traitorous “black woman” —contain some of the most exquisite and haunting poems ever written, and deal with eternal subjects such as love and love. infidelity, memory and mortality. , and the destruction caused by Time. Is also included A lover’s complaint, originally published with the sonnets, in which a young woman is heard lamenting that she was betrayed by a heartless seducer.

Buy it here.

Books by Kate Middleton

Sense and sensitivity by Jane Austen

A classic Austen with timeless charm, Sense and sensitivity tells the story of Marianne Dashwood who wears her heart on her sleeve. When she falls in love with dashing but misfit John Willoughby, she ignores her sister Elinor’s warning that her impulsive behavior leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile, Elinor, always sensitive to social conventions, struggles to hide her own disappointment in love, even from those close to her. Through their parallel experience of love – and its threatened loss – the sisters learn that meaning must mingle with sensitivity if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money rule the rules of love. love.

Buy it here.

Books by Kate Middleton

Northanger Abbey Jane austen

During a hectic season in Bath, the young and naive Catherine Morland experiences for the first time the joys of fashionable society. She’s delighted with her new acquaintances: the flirtatious Isabella, who shares Catherine’s love for gothic romance and horror, and the sophisticated Henry and Eleanor Tilney, who invite her to their father’s mysterious home, Northanger Abbey. . There, her imagination influenced by sensational novels and intrigue, Catherine imagines the terrible crimes committed by General Tilney. With its broad comedy and its irrepressible heroine, it is the youngest and most optimistic of the works of Jane Austen.

Buy it here.

Books by Kate Middleton

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

Pulled out of the poverty of her parents’ home in Portsmouth, Fanny Price was raised with her wealthy cousins ​​in Mansfield Park, well aware of her humble rank and with her cousin Edmund as her only ally. During his uncle’s absence in Antigua, the Crawfords arrive in the neighborhood, bringing with them the glamor of London life and a reckless taste for flirtation. Mansfield Park is considered Jane Austen’s first mature work and, with its low-key heroine and subtle examination of social standing and moral integrity, one of its deepest.

Buy it here.

Books by Kate Middleton

Tess des D’Urberville by Thomas Hardy

When Tess Durbeyfield is driven by family poverty to claim kinship with the wealthy D’Urberville and seek part of the family fortune, meeting her “cousin” Alec turns out to be her downfall. A very different man, Angel Clare, seems to offer her love and salvation, but Tess must choose to reveal her past or remain silent in the hope of a peaceful future.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

Walking middle by George Eliot

George Eliot’s nuanced and moving novel is a masterful evocation of connected lives, changing fortunes and human frailties in a provincial community. Populating its landscape are Dorothea Brooke, a young idealist whose search for intellectual fulfillment leads her to a disastrous marriage with the pedantic scholar Casaubon; Dr Lydgate, whose pioneering medical methods, combined with a reckless marriage to spendthrift beauty Rosamond, threaten to undermine his career; and the religious hypocrite Bulstrode, hiding outrageous crimes from his past.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

Dorian Gray’s photo by Oscar Wilde

Captivated by his own exquisite portrait, Dorian Gray trades his soul for eternal youth and beauty. Influenced by his friend Lord Henry Wotton, he is drawn into a corrupt double life; indulging his desires in secret while remaining a gentleman in the eyes of polite society. Only his portrait bears the traces of his decadence. The novel was a scandal success and the book was then used as evidence against Wilde at Old Bailey in 1895. It has lost none of its power to fascinate and disturb.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

The terrible spectacle of the beast, the fog of the moor, the discovery of a body, this classic horror story pits detective against dog. When Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead in the wild Devon heathlands with the footprints of a giant dog nearby, the fault lies with a family curse. It is up to Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to solve the mystery of the legend of the ghost dog before Sir Charles’ heir meets an equally gruesome end.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

The Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

As night falls, a man caught in a snowstorm is forced to take shelter in the eerie and sinister house in Wuthering Heights. It is a place he will never forget. There he will come to learn Cathy’s story: how she was forced to choose between her well-meaning husband and the dangerous man she loved since she was young. How his choice led to betrayal and terrible revenge – and continues to plague those of the present. How love can transgress authority, conventions, even death.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

The odyssey by Homer

One of the earliest and greatest works of Western literature is the epic tale of Odysseus and his ten-year return journey after the Trojan War. Faced with natural and supernatural threats – shipwrecks, battles, monsters and the relentless enmity of the sea god Poseidon – Odysseus must use his native wit and cunning if he is to reach his homeland safely and overcome obstacles that, even there, waiting for him.

Buy it here.

kate middleton books

dark house by Charles Dickens

As the interminable Jarndyce and Jarndyce case weaves its way through the Court of Chancellery, it unites a disparate group of people: Ada and Richard Clare, whose legacy is gradually eaten away by legal costs; Esther Summerson, ward of the court, whose parentage is a source of deepening of the mystery; the lawyer threatening Tulkinghorn; the determined detective, Inspector Bucket; and even Jo, the helpless little sweeper.

Buy it here.

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